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Terry goodkind the law of nines pdf

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The Law of Nines is a thriller/speculative fiction novel by American author Terry Goodkind. . Print/export. Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version. The Law Of Nines Terry Goodkind. Enneagram Type Nine Description - Russell Rowe enneagram type nine description click on a link below to. Turning twenty-seven may be terrifying for some, but for Alex, a struggling artist living in the Midwest, it is cataclysmic. Something about this birthday,, ISBN.


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You can easily download The Law of Nines Pdf, The Law of Nines Pdf by In Alex, Terry Goodkind brings to life a modern hero in a whole new. TERRY GOODKIND. 4 way so that the passenger couldn't hurt her, but the police had shown up first. She looked up at him in silent command. “Sorry,” he said. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Starred Review. Science fiction author Goodkind takes a new approach to the modern-day thriller in this fantastic .

When it ended, I breathed a huge sigh of not completion and satisfaction, but relief. The words dance across the page like a stiffly choreographed sequence geared to a specific audience. I find it a painful truth as I've in the past found Goodkind's works to be interesting reads, but as Alex said, and Richard before him, the truth is the truth and wishing won't change it. The dealings of the Confederacy. There are references both direct and remote that allude to these novels. Because he is so goddamned good at painting trees, he noticed a tree was in a position that was all stupid looking or something, so he knew the portal would kill all those people. In fact, the specific nature of the MacGuffin may be ambiguous, undefined, generic, left open to interpretation or otherwise completely unimportant to the plot.

On his 27th birthday, Ben gives Alex a packet of papers and explains that it is an inheritance that passes to the oldest member of Alex's bloodline. It would have passed to his mother, but she was committed soon after her 27th birthday and so the inheritance passes to Alex. The inheritance is a huge swath of land in the far east part of the country in a heavily wooded and mountainous nature preserve.

If he so chooses, he can sell it to the "Daggett Trust", which controls the rest of the nature preserve. Ben urges Alex to sell the land and live handsomely for the rest of his life on the profits. Alex agrees to think about it, and leaves.

As Alex returns to the gallery, he comes across Jax again and his adventure truly begins.

Jax tries to convince Alex of the truth of her story. They discuss the meaning of the name Alexander: Saviour of Men, in relation to a prophecy stating that Alex will have to save another world; the world Jax comes from. As events unfold that open Alex' mind to all the implications Jax' story has, if true, he becomes mixed up in a battle between worlds and a massive conspiracy that he must unravel in order to save not only his own life.

Alex decides to trust Jax, leading him into the adventure of a lifetime. When in Terry Goodkind finished his Sword of Truth series with Confessor he announced his next work The Law of Nine as "a whole new kind of high-octane thriller" [4] and a parting from the fantasy genre. However upon its publication it became obvious that there were parallels and references to be drawn between this new book and his previous series:. Tina Jordan of Entertainment Weekly expected the book to appeal to both fantasy and thriller fans alike.

She predicted that if a sequel is written it will, however, take place in a fantasy setting. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. New York Times. Entertainment Weekly.

Terry Goodkind. Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The Law of Nines - Wikipedia

The Sword of Truth by Terry Goodkind. Debt of Bones They seemed watered down version of Richard and Kahlan, and very, very square-jawed romance aisle versions at that.

Alex started annoying me just about from the first when he complains about his girlfriend Bethany texting him all the time. He doesn't like her.

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He doesn't look at the text messages, but apparently he can't get up the nerve to simply say, "Look, I'm just not that into you.

It's a shame. Goodkind is capable of much better, as the first several books in his series proved. I picked this one up on a whim because I had a few dollars left on a gift card and I had never read any Terry Goodkind, although I had heard quite a bit about his books. After reading the blurb on the back, I was intrigued enough to add it to my stack of selections and make my purchases, it then got set aside and I forgot about it for a while.

Imagine how thrilled I was when I ran across this book on the shelf one day, started to read it and could not put it down. I don't know how I never read an I picked this one up on a whim because I had a few dollars left on a gift card and I had never read any Terry Goodkind, although I had heard quite a bit about his books.

I don't know how I never read any of Mr. Goodkinds books before this one, but I was immediately hooked. His characters were great and the story moved along beautifully full of action, suspense and mystery. I liked that in this particular novel, Mr. Goodkind mixed the world that we all live in with peril and mystery moving in and out of it from the fantasy world.

I found that mix to be quite refreshing and even though it was a bit predictable at points, the rest of the story and the characters just made me want to continue reading even when I had figured certain things out along the way.

All in all, a great mostly blind purchase that now will cost me many more dollars and enjoyable hours catching up on the rest of the series. I look forward to getting started on Wizard's First Rule soon! Oct 23, Odile rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Goodkind fans only. The Law of Nines is best described as a supernatural thriller, and especially the seemingly mundane beginnings of the book are quite a change from the usual fantasy worlds.

The protagonist, Alex Rahl, is linked to the universe of The Sword of Truth by his last name, as well as in other ways that become clear as the book progresses. Alex is a struggling painter, at odds with a society that seems to place highest value on superficiality and fleeting ideals.

The video game BioShock did so extensively, and in a way that was more fulfilling than that of this book. Sadly enough, The Law of Nines offers little of that, even when a book might appear a better medium for ideological reflection than a science-fiction horror computer game. In this sense, Goodkind hampers his own agenda, by putting ideas in the foreground, at the cost of characters and story, and it is to the detriment of the value of the book as a work, whether it be philosophy, art, or entertainment.

Nevertheless, despite these issues The Law of Nines has quite some value as a thriller. View 1 comment. Aug 20, Brian rated it it was ok. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Can't say I typically bother writing reviews, but after finishing this book I'm having trouble not. I liked the idea of following the Rahl bloodline in this world, I enjoyed some of the little links between the Sword of Truth series and this book-Jennsen's, or Tom's old dagger, the idea of spells of three, Orden Nebraska, the Woman of mystery figurine, ect.

Beyond this the book is sadly lacking. The characters just aren't up to par for Goodkind. In every ot Can't say I typically bother writing reviews, but after finishing this book I'm having trouble not. Alex at times practically quotes Richard from Naked Empire. I suppose I can see what he was trying to do with the allusions to his other works, but there is something to be said for subtlety.

The defined original characters I've always loved just aren't there. As far as plot, that was worse. How many times has Goodkind reused this same idea of people fighting for a world without magic? You've got the war 3, years before Wizard's First Rule, the main conflict in the Sword of Truth series with the Imperial Order, and while the most unique, but still in the same vein, the partitioning of Westland after the War with D'hara.

Why rehash it with the Law of Nines? The ideology, the arguments, they are all the same. Less grand annoyances are scattered throughout: No one being able to trace the Rahl bloodline in Jax's world past Richard-the Rahl family always played a pivotal role, good or bad, in that world and suddenly the just disappear and die out?

With how heavily implied it was that she is a confessor and all-"Queens bow to me", how upset she got during the whole mother confessor figurine thing, "I've never had a friend before".

This is very unlike Goodkind as anyone who has even glanced at his overview of prophecy can attest. And speaking of prophecy, he does a lot to contradict himself here.

Anyone who remembers the end of Confessor and how Nathan points out that prophecy is blind to a world without magic-the great void as he called it-how prophecy is incapable of saying anything about such a place, would, I imagine, be just a little curious as to how a core prophecy can be about someone from said great void.

They go on, but I'll leave it at that. On the whole I just found this book to be profoundly disappointing. I applaud the effort, but not the result. The start to this series was less than mediocre and if the following can't do a lot to help it along the series won't be worth the time wasted reading it.

I find it a painful truth as I've in the past found Goodkind's works to be interesting reads, but as Alex said, and Richard before him, the truth is the truth and wishing won't change it. Aug 27, Emily Diehl rated it liked it. This book is strange so far.

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Goodkind, why do you torture us like so? When a certain name came up I thought of his other series. The idea is also the same. He lives in a world of technology and she lives in a world of magic.

Almost the same as The Sword of Truth. It just makes me laugh and want to keep reading it. I love it, the idea about love just takes over for me. The h This book is strange so far. The hope for Alex and Jax.

Ah, too much of a hopeless action-romantic. Quite harsh Mr. This book could've and still can be written as a series. It leaves me wanting to know more about the characters, how they got where they are, who they are related to, etc. The true beauty that drives this book comes from your characters actions in regards to distress.

I love it. It sort of reminds me of another 'perfect' love you created. Seriously, I almost slept with the book in my arms last night, just to 'feel' that gorgeous love.

Cheers to you Mr. Goodkind for taking old love and showing us it still works, and for driving me nuts. Oct 13, Erin Hawley rated it it was ok. Terry Goodkind rushed the finale of his Sword of Truth novels I was really disappointed with Law of Nines despite the allusions to the novels I so love. I felt like the story was a direct parallel to Wizard's First Rule, except in today's world. Their love seemed fake and convenient Terry Goodkind rushed the finale of his Sword of Truth novels Their love seemed fake and convenient compared to Richard and Kahlan.

The Ayn Rand philosophies were much more muted than in the last novels of SoT, but still present. I wouldn't say it was a thriller The ending was a let down, too. Bottom line: Terry Goodkind tries to recreate the success he had with Wizard's First Rule, but falls short with flat writing, flat characters, and a flat message.

I wish he would have spent the time he took writing this novel to perfect the 50 page resolution of a page epic. Oct 10, Michael rated it it was ok Shelves: After reading "Wizard's First Rule" earlier this year, I wasn't inclined to pick up any more of Terry Goodkind's fantasy novels.

So, when I heard that his new novel, "The Law of Nines" was an attempt to take his writing in another direction with a novel that was labeled as a thriller, I decided I'd give Goodkind another chance.

Download The Law of Nines ebook {PDF} {EPUB}

Unfortunately, every issue I had with "Wizard" was on display here in "Nines. On his 27th birthday, he rescues a beautiful After reading "Wizard's First Rule" earlier this year, I wasn't inclined to pick up any more of Terry Goodkind's fantasy novels. On his 27th birthday, he rescues a beautiful woman from death, finds out about a family legacy and begins to discover there is more to his life than meets the eye.

On paper, it sounds fairly interesting, but right from the first chapter, Goodkind's story seems little more than a rehash of "Wizard's First Rule. Of course, the two can't be together due to complicated reasons that are meant to drive the narrative forward and make the romance feel "forbidden" but instead only serve as a reminder of the same plotline and thread in "Wizard.

Alex could be an interesting character if Goodkind didn't repeat his same mistake from his other novels and have him sit around and contemplated his navel for pages on end. The sheer number of pages in this book could be cut in half if they'd trim some of the characters sits around and reflects on things that have just happened in the previous chapter parts.

It becomes more obvious in this one because the chapters are shorter, so the recaps become more and more unnecessary. And the novel isn't helped by being sold as a "thriller.

If so, he's not doing so well since this novel clearly has fantasy elements written all over it. There's some mysterious land left to Alex as part of his family inheritance and characters who cross between their realm and ours to either befriend, bewitch or bewilder our hero. But being the kind of reader I am, I found myself just intrigued enough to want to find out where it all ends. Thankfully, this novel seems fairly self-contained so hopefully we won't get a plethora of sequels.

I feel as if Goodkind could be a good writer if he'd eliminate some of what I see as excesses in his writing. But having read two of his books now and seeing no attempt to correct these excesses, I doubt he'll ever really be my cup of tea. Aug 14, Cathy rated it really liked it Shelves: I would like it if every reviewer would say whether they've read The Sword of Truth Series or not. It might indicate interesting trends in how people enjoy the book. I would love to compare my experience as a fan of Sword to those who didn't like it as much, and even more to those who are reading Goodkind in a new genre for the first time.

I bet the author and publisher would also like to kn I would like it if every reviewer would say whether they've read The Sword of Truth Series or not. I bet the author and publisher would also like to know how newbies and fans react differently or the same. Could be interesting! I really have no idea what people who haven't read The Sword of Truth will think. My main motivation in reading so quickly was to see what the connections were. It certainly wasn't scary-suspenseful, although it was often exciting and occasionally violent, but not gory or anything.

What it was is almost an exact carbon-copy of Wizard's First Rule set in our world in a modern time. Same guy, same girl, same story, same philosophy and rants. Still interesting to some degree, although I'd guess that the philosophizing would be a lot more interesting to someone who hasn't already read 11 long books of it. Goodkind is still a very strong writer who turns a terrific phrase and writes a vivid and engaging story. Alex and Jax are as likable as Richard and Kahlan, probably because they are clones.

Goodkind used the modern American setting to full advantage, illustrating some of the scariest horrors our world offers to helpless victims. It really was a 3. I do think it's funny that Goodkind is such a mix of tough guy and softy. He seems to believe in love at first sight. His guys are warriors and brainiacs, his women are lovely fighting machines.

It's really very Heinleinesque. View all 7 comments. Mar 05, Al rated it did not like it Shelves: I was keenly reminded upon finishing this book that I should have remembered my vow to never read Terry Goodkind ever again.

Aug 20, Jake rated it it was ok. I just finished Terry Goodkind's new book, the Law of Nines. Before I go on, I will warn there are spoilers in this review. I loved Goodkind's Sword of Truth series. Finally, some fantasy with depth and vision.

The Law of Nines

What made that series so incredible was the way he mixed in philosophy the objectivism found in Ayn Rand's books with a really great and entertaining fantasy tale. Richard and Kahlan, the two main characters in that series, were believable as lovers and as heroes. They both progressed and developed in very natural ways that made the reader get really attached to them. He had created a world that did not seem irrational because it mirrored our own so well except it had magic.

The ending of the series was particularly interesting because it was unexpected. Lord Rahl, Richard, ends up sending those who are against his philosophy the bad guys to our world. What a cool commentary. Goodkind essentially said, in the end, that those bad people live in our world and they are trying to push the same philosophies here as they were there. I needed to tell you all that information for you to understand my review of the new book. Now, I had heard that Terry Goodkind was going to write in the thriller genre.

I was ecstatic because I don't think that authors should always have to write in one genre. Certainly, if you are a good enough writer, you should be able to write in several genres. It was a little weird, at first, to realize I was reading Goodkind when all that was happening was on our world and in a modern time. Not only that, the writing quality was nowhere near the quality of the Sword of Truth series. I read a review that called the writing "blocky and strained. Then he started throwing in all these hints about the world from his other series.

I was shocked and a little excited because it was unexpected. But then I found that the fact that he tied in this book with the other world made no sense. We get 1, years worth of history between the end of Sword of Truth to this book in just a chapter.

I felt like someone had taken a beautiful painting and written all over it with marker. Oh wait, that's what happens in The Law of Nines not only once, but twice, a detail which was confusing because somehow the bad guy, Radell Cain, had been watching Alex Rahl the whole time.

That brings another point. Alex Rahl. Rahl is Richard's last name. How the hell did a Rahl get to our world? This is a detail Goodkind never addresses. Then, not only that, his love interest is Jax Amnell which is the same last name as Kahlan in the other series. Correct me if I'm wrong but, if Richard and Kahlan got married which it's not outlandish to think that they did , Kahlan would no longer be Kahlan Amnell.

She would be Kahlan Rahl. I was really confused. Her last name was supposed to be some big revelation, but I found myself wrinkling my nose in distaste because of the implications.

Whether or not that was intended, I know not. Moving on. Alex is a nice guy, right? He's your average Joe at the beginning of the novel when he saves Jax from a van that's about to run her over.

Somehow, in the midst of all this, Alex goes from regular Joe to a killing machine. There is a gruesome description of Alex strangling a nurse at the psych ward where his mother is being taken care of. The nurse is a bad lady, but this is one of the first acts of violence in the book. It makes me less sympathetic to Alex simply because we have not seen the bad guys do anything really terrible up to that point. Another thing. The action scenes drag on forever. And I found myself skimming a lot toward the end because I wanted to get to the main point of the story.

It took forever for the climax to come around and it was disappointing. It all felt like a rehash of The Wizard's First Rule. Well, more like a cheap imitation of it because WFR is fantastic. This book is just mediocre. I guess I could sit and nitpick at the book all day long. Kudos to Goodkind for trying to get out of the fantasy realm. I've been trying to figure out if it is best to read this book without having read the other series, or if you should read SoT and then read this book. I don't know.

This book relies so heavily on you understanding what happened in SoT that it would be even more confusing if you had not read them. I would only recommend this book if you're a die-hard Terry Goodkind fan. I am still a fan because he was able to produce an amazing series, but I hope his next book is not as hard to get through as this one was.

It was entertaining, but not worth getting excited over. I kind of hope he returns to fantasy. We shall see. Aug 20, Meredith rated it did not like it.

Terry Goodkind presents: Terry Goodkind's Glock of Truth novels. Once upon a time Goodkind wrote some pretty decent sword-and-sorcery novels. Not mind-blowing, not life-changing, but solid and fun adventure stories with some seriously superb world building and characters that I liked enough to follow to the end of the Sword of Truth series. Followed it to the bitter end, because my affection for the characters was the only thing that sustained my interest in an increasingly preachy and unenjoyabl Terry Goodkind presents: Followed it to the bitter end, because my affection for the characters was the only thing that sustained my interest in an increasingly preachy and unenjoyable series.

When it ended, I breathed a huge sigh of not completion and satisfaction, but relief. But I can't write a review of The Law of Nines without talking about the Sword of Truth series, because this book is basically an extension of that series.

Even if Goodkind thinks this is an independent new work and if he doesn't, his marketers seem to think so , I consider this the latest addition to the Sword of Truth series. So when I heard that Goodkind was going to write another novel, this time a modern day thriller, I was interested to see what he'd do outside the series he's spent over a decade writing books for. I was disappointed, though, when I first read the cover flap and found out that his main character's last name was Rahl.

I had a sinking feeling that Alex Rahl was going to be Richard Rahl 2. Worse, though, while I started out liking Richard in the Sword of Truth novels and then grew to dislike his speechifying and rhetoric later in the series, Alex is immediately as self-righteous and preachy as Later! Richard so I never really warmed to him. Jax isn't so much a person as an excuse to move the story along, and I guess Jax and Alex love each other because Goodkind tells me that they do.

The appeal of Richard and Kahlan's relationship in the Sword of Truth novels is gone; there's no challenge or romance in this that made me cheer for Alex and Jax like I did for Richard and Kahlan. It's sad when you know what an author can do, and he doesn't deliver. Furthermore, the plot is not particularly interesting. Alex and Jax chase across the country, followed by evildoers from the Sword of Truth world.

There's not much suspense there, because we pretty much know at least Alex has to make it to their destination, and if Jax dies along the way There's a villain who's evil I guess just because he likes being evil, which is never all that interesting. Nothing about the plot is more complex than "You Bad, Me Good," and characters are the way they are because the plot requires it, not because they have any dimension to them.

The book is less a story than a vehicle for Goodkind to deliver his particular flavor of Randian Objectivism. As in the last several books in the Sword of Truth novels, Goodkind's philosophical leanings are glaringly apparent in The Law of Nines.

It's grating for readers like me who are only there for a solid piece of fiction, not to get the Truth According to Terry Goodkind. I know what you think, Terry. I'm not opposed to an author who wants to twine in philosophical leanings with a story, but I feel like Goodkind has played, ad nauseum, an Ayn Rand techno remix at full volume throughout his last several books.

Nowadays, his writing doesn't engage me in thought like he obviously wants it to rather than turn me off. I simply don't engage with his literature like I did when reading Wizard's First Rule , which is a shame.

This reads more like Sword of Truth fanfiction than a novel that can stand on its own merit. Sorry, Terry. I think I should see other authors now. It's been real.

Nov 22, Melinda Haas rated it it was ok. As a diehard fan of The Sword of Truth series and Terry Goodkind, I felt this was a compromised peice of work, similar to the Legend of the Seeker television series. It feels like Terry did not spend the time fleshing out the story and the characters as well as he did with SOT. When he started referencing Alex lifting his gun to make sure it was ready and Jax' special smile she only gave Alex, among other things, I really came up short and couldn't believe he had borrowed so carelessly from the As a diehard fan of The Sword of Truth series and Terry Goodkind, I felt this was a compromised peice of work, similar to the Legend of the Seeker television series.

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When he started referencing Alex lifting his gun to make sure it was ready and Jax' special smile she only gave Alex, among other things, I really came up short and couldn't believe he had borrowed so carelessly from the the Richard and Kahlan characters. It just seems like he put all of his effort into his original series, and the spinoff works are just to milk it for money without regard for the quality of SOT. It just feels like he is yielding to the pressure of the commonness of what's popular, which really goes against his entire philosophy in his stories.

I actually recognized the potential for a spinoff when Richard created our world and put all of the nonmagical people in it.

If he could just spend a little more time with some intelligent design, it might be worth checking out the inevitable next novel where Jax comes back so he can help her with the next problem that is sure to immerge. After all, when Richard killed Darken Rahl and then sent him back to the keeper again, there was a whole new set of problems that took the rest of the series to resolve. Nothing leads me to believe Terry won't copy that idea for this series. Another problem with this series is the lack of detail in the law of nines.

He never made it clear how the law of nines works, other than Alex was born on September 9th, at 9: Aug 28, Tulara rated it really liked it. I am usually reluctant to read what I call "changeover" books - authors who cross their specialty writing to another. Terry Goodkind wrote a new book, but it's a mystery thriller type of book.

Oh, it has magic and the Terry Goodkind guy who doesn't know he's to save the world kind of formula. I was getting really engrossed, but then the "hero's" last name was Rahl. As in Darken Rahl, Richard Rahl??? And I'm not even going to tell you the last name of the woman of magic I am usually reluctant to read what I call "changeover" books - authors who cross their specialty writing to another. Pretty good story, but falls back on the Sword of Truth series a little too much for me.

I'd rather read more our Richard and Kahlan. And Goodkind really looks different - from when he first started writing with his long blond hair - and just a writer-looking guy. On this book jacket, he's shaved his head and wears a black turtleneck and stands like he's a clothes model. In fact, the description of the villian in the book reminds me of the picture of the author on the back cover. Jan 22, James rated it it was ok Shelves: Contrary to the summary provided on goodreads for this book, I did NOT think that Goodkind "proved he could jump genres.

Aside from that, I really enjoyed that series. It was clever and dramatic. This however, was a mostly failed attempt to "jump genres" but really not do anyt Contrary to the summary provided on goodreads for this book, I did NOT think that Goodkind "proved he could jump genres. This however, was a mostly failed attempt to "jump genres" but really not do anything of the sort. Well, actually he did abandon all of the good stuff about his previous books. For anyone who missed that reference, this book was like a bad spin off.

Goodkind kept throwing in random details that link the content of this book with his previous work, but the connections would either be lost on non-fans or eye rolling to fans. I could tell that Goodkind kept trying to bring in the same type of dynamics and social commentary that existed in the sword of truth books, but without the overt fantasy setting.

The result is that you get a lame "thriller" which incorporates hollow and loosely supported fantasy elements. And because Goodkind has "jumped genres", we get the slew of descriptions of weapon hardware and over the top explanations of "how it really could happen because it's real world stuff" that you commonly find in thriller books, and which I tend to hate.

It really wasn't all that exciting anyway. The most the book held my attention was when the protagonist was held against his will in a mental institution. Goodkind held my attention as I overly scrutinized the escape scene and description of psychotropic medication to see if he did his homework. That's the beauty of a fantasy landscape--you can do whatever you want, as long as you stick to your own rules. With real world thrillers, you have to research your Glocks and your car parts and your thorazine to make sure you got it right, and then make sure you convince the reader you're being realistic or you'll get angry letters.

Probably not worth it.

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I've noticed that books that disappoint or appall me get long reviews and the good ones get a single line or paragraph. Guess I like to gripe and point out flaws? Or maybe they just make themselves targets? Jan 01, Judy rated it it was ok. First, let me say I was very disappointed in the Sword of Truth finale. I was first drawn into his Sword of Truth series because of the descriptions of the characters and the world that just made it all feel real.

Towards the end of the series, though, the books seemed to be shallow. I continued to read them, though, because by that point I had to know how it all worked out for Lord Rahl and Kahlan. The last book seemed to be written as though TG was tired of the whole thing and had one more cho First, let me say I was very disappointed in the Sword of Truth finale. The last book seemed to be written as though TG was tired of the whole thing and had one more chore to do in order to be through with it all.

When I started reading it, I felt TG might be on track by trying his skill with a different genre. Was I wrong. Unfortunately he has merely attempted to recreate and old love story between Lord Rahl and Kahlan, and insults the reader by resurrecting what was best left finished in the Sword of Truth series.

I am disappointed in his writing, too. I felt nothing for the characters in this book. I don't really care what happens. He should have kept the grandfather and mother alive I have no attachment to any character in this book. I also found some dialogue incredibly unbelievable. For example, Alex is suppose to be acting drugged up and unable to rationalize or feel anything because of the drugs, yet is able to convince the villians why they shouldn't violate Jax.

The villians didn't question this? I also couldn't believe that Jax and Alex would have long discussions while escaping a burning building or villians! Incredibly insulting to the intelligence of the reader.

I am not sure if I will spend any more reading time on TG books.

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How sad, because I know he is a talented writer as his earlier works proved. Jul 01, Robert rated it liked it. I read Terry Goodkind's "Sword of Truth" series some time ago, so when I heard rumors of this book I was quite intrigued. I read that it was a non-fantasy change up for Goodkind and that excited me even more; I love fantasy, but I love a good change up, a break from the mold, even more.

All of the publisher's material hinted at "a stunning" new book that defied genres The book is good, don't get me wrong. I enjoyed it very much. However, this was a fantasy bo I read Terry Goodkind's "Sword of Truth" series some time ago, so when I heard rumors of this book I was quite intrigued.

There was nothing out of the ordinary and nothing that was particularly "stunning". The main character is a descendant of Lord Rahl, but he exists in our world and current time I won't go further.

Neat trick, and the end is set up for more to come, but still not "stunning". Now, the story itself is fun, fast paced, and a good read, but it has a few issues as well. The main character is an artist who starts out as a kind of lovable bumbling everyday Joe, but by the end is killing people by the dozens and can handle himself in a gun or knife fight as well as a seasoned assassin. I won't get into all of the times I stopped and thought, "Now wait a minute Jul 23, Kendra rated it did not like it Shelves: I was very disappointed with this book.

I am an avid Terry Goodkind fan, and I absolutely love his Sword of Truth series, so needless to say I was very excited when I heard he was writing another book that supposedly had nothing to do with Richard and Kahlan.

Terry Goodkind basically put the exact same personalities and looks into the same characters, called them different first names, and threw them into a Sword of Truth plot that took place I was very disappointed with this book. Terry Goodkind basically put the exact same personalities and looks into the same characters, called them different first names, and threw them into a Sword of Truth plot that took place in our world, except it was lacking most of the plot elements that make SoT books such good stories.

I understand that the whole point of the book was that they were descendants of Richard and Kahlan and it was suppose to be an explanation of what happened to the people who left for a world without magic at the end of Confessor, but for me it was a huge disappointment. Don't waste your time with this repetitive predictable attempt at writing. What happened to the author who wrote the first few Sword of Truth books?

Jan 09, BookWarden rated it liked it Shelves: I finished Sword of Truth in , have since read stories that are objectively far better, and then I fell for the hate. I thought poorly on the series, focused only on its negative aspects. Then recently I dreamed of the series. It tugged at my mind and brought me back in, so I began again with Omen Machine and discovered it was better than I 3. It tugged at my mind and brought me back in, so I began again with Omen Machine and discovered it was better than I remembered, and FAR better than people online make it out to be.

Personal opinion, of course, rules all. So I came into Law of Nines with all the poor reviews bracing me, and got ready to read an awful cash-grab book with little logic. And would you look at that, I find the negative reviews wrong again. The book is not perfect, but not awful. Let's discuss! That's all I'll say. For the good qualities, this is a very intriguing book. The mysteries and the action move along nicely, the situations are tense and brutal. There are great concepts in here, and they're executed in very satisfying ways, often.

The plot is a mixed bag at times, however. This book reads very much like an homage to Wizard's First Rule, and that can leave the characterization feeling pretty weak at times.

Sometimes I liked the parallels between Alex and Richard, and sometimes I don't. My favorite parallel is when Alex checks his gun in the holster the same way Richard would check his sword in its scabbard.

Why does Alex live in a town called Orden? That should mean something, but it doesn't.